thegreatborissov
ilovecharts:

How much snow it takes to cancel school in the U.S
If you were a box of cereal, what would you be and why?

Bed Bath & Beyond, Sales Associate interview.

The weirdest job interview questions hiring managers ask

(via fastcompany)

flavorpill:

The Best and Worst of Last Night’s ‘SNL’ with Drake
Today, January 21, is National Hugging Day and Squirrel Appreciation Day. How will you be celebrating?

npr:

I guess I need to go find some squirrels to hug. 

-Lauren

guardian:

In flight: see the planes in the sky right now – interactive
To mark 100 years of passenger air travel, our stunning interactive uses live data to show every one of the thousands of commercial planes currently in the air. Prepare for take off

guardian:

In flight: see the planes in the sky right now – interactive

To mark 100 years of passenger air travel, our stunning interactive uses live data to show every one of the thousands of commercial planes currently in the air. Prepare for take off

m1ssred:

chemical reaction

The price of dried cockroaches has increased tenfold, from about $2 a pound to as much as $20, as manufacturers of traditional medicine stockpile pulverized cockroach powder.

Cockroach farms multiplying in China, according to Barbara Demick of the LA Times.

I think I speak for all of New York City when I say, “You can have ours.”

(via wnycradiolab)
npr:

(via 22 Maps That Show The Deepest Linguistic Conflicts In America)

Joshua Katz, a Ph. D student in statistics at North Carolina State University, just published a group of awesome visualizations of a linguistic survey that looked at how Americans pronounce words. 

Among the words he maps are crawfish, syrup, caramel, lawyer, mayonnaise and pecan. He also maps regions by how they refer to a carbonated beverage (the age-old soda or pop question) and how people address groups of two or more people — though as someone who spent time in Pittsburgh, yinz seems to be conspicuously absent. — heidi

npr:

(via 22 Maps That Show The Deepest Linguistic Conflicts In America)

Joshua Katz, a Ph. D student in statistics at North Carolina State University, just published a group of awesome visualizations of a linguistic survey that looked at how Americans pronounce words. 

Among the words he maps are crawfish, syrup, caramel, lawyer, mayonnaise and pecan. He also maps regions by how they refer to a carbonated beverage (the age-old soda or pop question) and how people address groups of two or more people — though as someone who spent time in Pittsburgh, yinz seems to be conspicuously absent. — heidi